Overview

Westsail 32 The Westsail 32 goes down in history as the boat that launched a thousand dreams. She’s generally credited for starting the cruising boom of the 1970s which brought “the cruising life” out of the fringes and into the mainstream. Designed by Bill Crealock as a heavy displacement double ender for long distance cruising, this boat is the epitome of seaworthiness; built strong and heavy with huge interior volume. The trade off is in nimbleness; she is slow through the tacks and slow to accelerate. In the early years, often sailed by beginners on badly setup rigs, boat speed was often lacking and she was ridiculed as the “Wet-snail 32″ among the bluewater sailing fraternity, however some of this reputation has been shrugged off in recent years. When sailed well the Westsail 32 can surprise.

History

The Westsail 32 started out life as a flush-deck Kendall 32 when Larry Kendall approached Crealock to design a heavy displacement offshore sailboat along the lines of William Aitken’s famous 32 foot double enders Eric and Thistle. It’s said when asked how big the market for such a boat, Crealock estimated 10-12 boats. The Kendall 32 was introduced in 1969 and production exceeded Crealock’s estimates with a run of 30 boats.

It wasn’t until 1971 when a young electrical engineer turned boatbuilder by the name of Snyder Vick who bought the molds did sales begin to take off. He had Crealock redesign the deck layout, adding a cabin house and a revised interior. The new company became Westsail Corporation and the new boat was dubbed the Westsail 32. “Westsail the world” was the advertising mantra, oozing adventure in far away places. So successful was the marketing campaign that by June of 1973 Time Magazine featured a four page spread on “the cruising life” including a large image of a Westsail 32 in a suitably exotic location. It caught the imagination of the American public. The boat sold in incredible numbers, and along the way set in stone the shape and style of American bluewater cruising boats for nearly two decades.

In total 830 boats were produced by Westsail. To keep up with demand around 400 of these boats were sold as hull and deck kits; requiring interior finishing by their respective purchasers. Kits were sold in various stages of completion; Hull and Deck, Sail-Away, and a complete boat. With kits owners could add any option they felt they wanted including ballast, bulkheads, rigging, etc.

Although the Westsail 32 was a runaway marketing success, the company did not enjoy financial success. The petroleum crunch of the 1970’s hit the company hard. Their sales process involved taking orders for boats at fixed prices and selling them out in the order in which they received them. This meant that the company was selling boats up to eighteen months later at prices that were considerably outdated. The company ceased operations in 1981. The molds got sold to P&M Worldwide and another 15 boats were sold in kit form before production finally ceased.

Configuration & Layout

Westsail 32 Layout The Westsail 32 follows a long line of traditional double-enders dating back to Colin Archer’s famous 19th century Norwegian pilot boat Regis Voyager which itself was influenced by Archer’s earlier work with designing lifeboats.

A cutter rig sits on top with a bowsprit forward and on some boats a boomkin astern. Below the waterline is a very full keel drawing 5 feet.

The deck arrangement has offshore work in mind. The lifelines are high and the high bulwark combine to provide a sense of security on the foredeck. The cockpit is suitably tiny as was the thinking for blue water sailboats, but it gets crowded quickly with more than two people.

Down below, there’s an enormous interior volume, definitely one of the largest and most livable interiors for 32 feet. There is a huge V-berth forward followed by the head, a port side dinette and starboard settee and a U-shaped galley to port and a starboard navigation station and quarter berth aft. An optional interior featured opposing settees and a centerline table. Later mods included a change in the head configuration and a sit down chart table.

The joinery was aimed more for function than all out beauty and the factory finish varied through the years. Many of the kit boats were finished by their owners superbly, however some are in serious need of TLC.

Construction

The hull is heavily built from hand-laid fiberglass in 12 layers with polyester resin resulting in a hull that ranges from 3/4 inch near the topsides to 1 1/8 inches at the turn of the bilge. The 3/4″ bulkheads are marine plywood and tabbed to the hull with fiberglass.

Ballast varied between boats, but always with at least 7,000 pounds. Some had 2,000 pounds of lead and 5,000 pounds of steel punchings. From 1974, cast lead was used in the keel cavity in three sections. One can easily tell the lead ballast because the keel sump is much deeper under the engine pan.

The deck and cabin trunk is fiberglass cored with two layers of half inch plywood, with an extra two inch plywood base to reinforce below the mast step. Many boats had teak decks at an unbelievably thick (and heavy) 13/16 inches. There were three versions of the deck molds. The first mold had a forward hatch and large heavy sliding companionway with a lazarette hatch that sat up above the deck. The second mold added a center skylight hatch, and the last mold added a cockpit locker, flush lazarette hatch and tapered black anodized aluminum stanchions with aluminum built into the mold for easy on off removal.

Later hulls had fiberglass gudgeons, earlier hulls had stainless steel gudgeons with a bronze pintal.

The hull to deck join with its substantial bulwark is strong, though not impervious to leaking.

Under Sail

Larry Smith's S/V Tamzin [Photo courtesy of Larry Smith, taken Dec 2007] The Westsail 32 has a reputation for getting cruisers where they want to go, though not very quickly. According to most owners this is falsely deserved. Motion through the water is comfortable, but the ride has been criticized by some as being relatively wet. Often this is a result of owners overloading their boats. While the boat can easily carry all she needs for comfortable cruising, she will be effected by loading her below her water line. Some owners report the wetness comes from the cockpit seats being flush with the side decks, so any water channeling down the side deck is likely to wet your bottom (some custom boats have this problem solved with a cockpit combing). Further; later models had a 3″ hawser added midships that eliminated much of water entering the cockpit.

As with many boats with full keels, the boat tracks well but trades this off for maneuverability; both under power and while under canvas. Acceleration is sluggish due to its large wetted area and light weather performance (without the correct sail combination) is nothing to brag about; 10 knots or more is needed before the boats starts moving nicely. The best point of sail is a beam to broad reach between 90 to 120 degrees off the wind with an optimal heal angle of 20 degrees, with good trade winds owners report the boat is capable of  7 knots which is its hull speed.

In the early days the boat had a terrible reputation under sail, perhaps not entirely deserved. Many owners were new to sailing and didn’t have the experience to make a heavy displacement boat perform well. The early rigs weren’t optimal, the mainsails were too big and the headsails too small. The boat gained a reputation for weather helm.

In more recent years the Westsail 32 has turned its slow reputation upside down. In 1988 David King skippered his personally modified** Westsail 32 Saraband to a Trans-Pacific Cup victory, a remarkable feat given the light wind conditions that year. Additionally we hear reports of owners logging week-long consecutive runs of 140 to 160 mile days during trade-wind sailing. Record runs aside, most owners can expect to average around 110 miles per day in the trades.

** David King has documented his modifications for other members of the Westsail Owners Association. The tweaks include subtle modifications to the keel and a revised rig with a smaller mainsail

Specifications

LOA: 40′ (including bowsprit and boomkin)
LOD: 32′ 0″
LWL: 27′ 6″
Beam: 11′ 0″
Draft: 5′ 0″
Displacement: 19,500 lbs.
Ballast: 7,000 lbs.
Sail Area: 629 sq. ft.
Bridge Clearance: 49′ 0″

Headroom: 6′ 2″
Water: 80 US gal.
Fuel: 70 US gal.
Engine: 25hp Volvo MD2B / 35hp Volvo MD3B / 50hp Perkins 4-107 diesel

Designer: William I. B. Crealock
Year Introduced: 1971
Year Ended: 1981
Builder: Westsail / P&M Worldwide

Buyers Notes

The Westsail 32 has suffered few if any structural problems over the years. It has a solid hull and osmotic blisters that appear on older boats are not an issue with the Westsail.

It’s worth checking out the fuel tanks, especially if they are of black iron. Other areas worth a check are the bottom fittings on the boomkin and the bobstay. Look for signs of rot in the plywood cored decking and signs of fiberglass compression at the mast step. As with any older boat, if the standing rigging is original consider replacing them.

Look for a boat that has 35 hp or more, the original 25hp Volvo MD2B is often reported as insufficient for a distance motoring into adverse weather.

There’s an active owners association at Westsail.org, it’s recommended interested buyers contact them for advice. Additionally, Bud Taplin is an known expert on Westsail boats, he was the first general manager at Westsail, and is now active in providing advice and surveying services for prospective buyers.

As at 2014 the asking price of Westsail 32s are in the range of $30k-$55k USD. Realistically these boats sell 10%-20% below asking price with most trading hands between $30k-$45k USD.

Similar Boats

Kendall 32
Westsail 42

Links & References

» Westsail Owners Association at Westsail.org
» Used Boat Notebook by John Kretschmer, an in depth look at the Westsail 32 (p73-p76)
» Twenty Small Sailboats to Take You Anywhere by John Vigor, (Ch20, p125) an in depth look at the Westsail 32. ISBN:978-0939837328
» Boat US, Jack Horner’s review of the Westsail 32
» Wikipedia’s entry on the Westsail 32

Gallery

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21 Responses to “Westsail 32”

  1. I’ve had my eyes set on what I believe to be an earlier west sail 32 – now after reading the info the choice is clear – thanks for sharing the truth & experience ! Hopefully some day I can add some of what I think or learn on my venture – happy west sail ~~~visions never lost of dream set forward~~~~~

  2. Michael Lane says:

    Lots of happy moments on the Inalla. My father in-law owned this boat. I rebuilt the motor for him in 96. wonder if she’s still going smooth.

  3. Stephen Young says:

    I love the picture of the Westsail featured on this page (Tamzin Rockport
    Texas ) I am starting a dream board my goal to own a Westsail 32 one day.I was wondering if I would be able to have a copy or negative ?
    thanks Stephen .

  4. jeff williams says:

    I am looking for a blue water boat and my marina has a westsale 32 listed for 38,000.00. Most my sailing will be single handed and off shore. Any advise on this boat would be help full. From all i have read it appears this boat is a capable cruiser.

  5. SailFarLiveFree says:

    It would be interesting to know how many of the other boats/designers listed here on BluewaterBoats.org were inspired or challenged by the Westsail 32? It’s often said that the W32 “started it all” in the cruising world. Even if the W32 isn’t for you, I think it deserves immense credit for shaping cruising and design.

  6. Steve Coughenour says:

    This is one of the first sailing vessel i was ever on, newport beach to cabo san lucas. My father H.C. Coughenour was the production manager for the westsail 32 ft line, he also had a shop in westminster california where he built the rudders for the westsail's. wow i love this site.

  7. David Wiencke says:

    I’m a big fan of Wm Atkin’s designs, so please excuse my persistance in trying to set the record straight in seeing him get deserved credit for the W32 design. This guy designed great boats, apparently for the love of it, because he got paid $100 for each design he churned out monthly for Motorboating Mag. I’ll bet he got few royalties for all the boats built from his designs.

    Two articles archived in the WOA website interview WIB Crealock where he gives Atkin credit, or avoids taking blame for what many considered a slow design. First is Windblown Vol.23,#4 winter 2001 pg.6 as follows:

    “Around 1965 the Westsail saga began with a builder named Larry Kendall, who came to Bill and asked if there was anything out there in the way of a market for cruising boats. Bill thought Larry might be able to sell “a dozen or so.” Larry decided on the Atkin Thistle, a husky 32-foot double-ender with a flush deck, and began tooling.

    The flush deck of Atkin’s original design found little appeal, so a trunk cabin version modeled after another Atkins design called Eric was created. Crealock drew the rig and some of the interior, before long, many people credited him with the hull design as well. “I did not touch the lines,” he assures me. “We wanted to keep the basic Atkin design.”

    Next is on page 86 of the 1978 Nautical Quarterly article about Westsail history, which can be found in the WOA archives, quotes WIB Crealock saying that while converting the design to fiberglass costuction, he was, “striving to maintain the original concept” and that the most noticable change he made was raising the shearline.

    Thanks, David Wiencke

  8. David Wiencke says:

    I’m a big fan of Wm Atkin’s designs, so please excuse my persistance in trying to set the record straight in seeing him get deserved credit for the W32 design. This guy designed great boats, apparently for the love of it, because he got paid $100 for each design he churned out monthly for Motorboating Mag. I’ll bet he got few royalties for all the boats built from his designs.

    Two articles archived in the WOA website interview WIB Crealock where he gives Atkin credit, or avoids taking blame for what many considered a slow design. First is Windblown Vol.23,#4 winter 2001 pg.6 as follows:

    “Around 1965 the Westsail saga began with a builder named Larry Kendall, who came to Bill and asked if there was anything out there in the way of a market for cruising boats. Bill thought Larry might be able to sell “a dozen or so.” Larry decided on the Atkin Thistle, a husky 32-foot double-ender with a flush deck, and began tooling.

    The flush deck of Atkin’s original design found little appeal, so a trunk cabin version modeled after another Atkins design called Eric was created. Crealock drew the rig and some of the interior, before long, many people credited him with the hull design as well. “I did not touch the lines,” he assures me. “We wanted to keep the basic Atkin design.”

    Next is on page 86 of the 1978 Nautical Quarterly article about Westsail history, which can be found in the WOA archives, quotes WIB Crealock saying that while converting the design to fiberglass costuction, he was, “striving to maintain the original concept” and that the most noticable change he made was raising the shearline.

    Thanks, David Wiencke

  9. Norm Rhines says:

    My boat likes the 151 miles/ day numbers In 10+kts of wind. In 15 kts and less than 2 meter seas I can shoot up to the low 170’s about the best I can do on good winds. On the GPS I often see 7.4Kts for 15min or an hour (seams to be the real hull speed for my boat) but then the wind or wave shifts and back to 7.0 +/-. My last trip to Maui (open ocean) I had to beat at about 40Deg off, but I motor sailed with the engine just about 1400RPM we covered the 89Knt.mile to Lanai from Oahu in about 12Hr. = 7.41Kts. The engine allowed me to keep my heading and not be pushed off buy the waves (the full keel thing when beating) and we kept above 7 the whole way (and yes it was very wet). coming back we averaged 6.8 but a much much much better ride downhill without the engine and mostly dry.

    Note:
    I have modified my boat buy faring out the stern/rudder area (see Dave kings write-up on this ) the rudder is 3-3/8″ wide in the front, the original keel faired back to 1″ radi. SO I have faired my hull out to 3.4″ wide in front of the rudder. I have also added a small horz fin to the aft bottom of the keel which does make a small (15% +/- ) reduction in pitch and roll above 6kts. i.e you can feel it kick in but it does not stop the pitching and roll just smoothes it a little bit (i.e. a little so if pitching 20 deg below 6kts you only pitch 18 deg above 6kts) , However below 6.05 kts. it does not seam to do much at all. Also I have cut the main sail down to have a foot length of 14′-0″ a loss of about 14″ off the original sail But with this reduction of sail aft, the boat balances very well.

    Dave King is a good guy to talk to about keeping the boat moving.

  10. Norm Rhines says:

    My boat likes the 151 miles/ day numbers In 10+kts of wind. In 15 kts and less than 2 meter seas I can shoot up to the low 170’s about the best I can do on good winds. On the GPS I often see 7.4Kts for 15min or an hour (seams to be the real hull speed for my boat) but then the wind or wave shifts and back to 7.0 +/-. My last trip to Maui (open ocean) I had to beat at about 40Deg off, but I motor sailed with the engine just about 1400RPM we covered the 89Knt.mile to Lanai from Oahu in about 12Hr. = 7.41Kts. The engine allowed me to keep my heading and not be pushed off buy the waves (the full keel thing when beating) and we kept above 7 the whole way (and yes it was very wet). coming back we averaged 6.8 but a much much much better ride downhill without the engine and mostly dry.

    Note:
    I have modified my boat buy faring out the stern/rudder area (see Dave kings write-up on this ) the rudder is 3-3/8″ wide in the front, the original keel faired back to 1″ radi. SO I have faired my hull out to 3.4″ wide in front of the rudder. I have also added a small horz fin to the aft bottom of the keel which does make a small (15% +/- ) reduction in pitch and roll above 6kts. i.e you can feel it kick in but it does not stop the pitching and roll just smoothes it a little bit (i.e. a little so if pitching 20 deg below 6kts you only pitch 18 deg above 6kts) , However below 6.05 kts. it does not seam to do much at all. Also I have cut the main sail down to have a foot length of 14′-0″ a loss of about 14″ off the original sail But with this reduction of sail aft, the boat balances very well.

    Dave King is a good guy to talk to about keeping the boat moving.

  11. David Wiencke says:

    Everything I’ve read about the Westsail design* credits William Atkin with the hull design that was used for the molds (the Eric or Thistle), and that William Crealock was hired to adapt the design to fiberglass construction for the Kendall, “updating” the cutter rig from a gaffer, and later hired by Westsail to redesign the interior layout and cabin house from the raised-deck Kendall version. In Crealock’s own words, in an interview in the archives of the WOA, he attempts to distance himself from the design by stating that he never touched the lines other than to raise the shearline and bulwarks about 6″.

    The Colin Archer inspired Eric was the first in a long line of “traditional” double-ender designs that William Atkin and his son spent much time refining. Check out the Atkin’s website .
    Billy Atkin was originally commissioned by Bill Nutting (editor of Motorboat mag.) and Arthur Hildebrand (author of Blue Water) in the 1920’s to design a 32′ version of the Archer Redinskoite. At the time, what they considered would be the ideal cruising boat.

    *John Leather-Colin Archer and his seaworthy Double-enders; Ferenc Mate-Best Boats to Build or Buy; Roger Taylor-More Good Boats.

    PS: My W32 is the driest 32′ boat I’ve ever sailed, probably because of the high freeboard and bulwarks.

    [Thanks David, I’ve updated the article to be more specific on the origins. I had previously lumped Aitkens into the general category of “Colin Archer double-enders” so did not mention him – Will]

  12. David Wiencke says:

    Everything I’ve read about the Westsail design* credits William Atkin with the hull design that was used for the molds (the Eric or Thistle), and that William Crealock was hired to adapt the design to fiberglass construction for the Kendall, “updating” the cutter rig from a gaffer, and later hired by Westsail to redesign the interior layout and cabin house from the raised-deck Kendall version. In Crealock’s own words, in an interview in the archives of the WOA, he attempts to distance himself from the design by stating that he never touched the lines other than to raise the shearline and bulwarks about 6″.

    The Colin Archer inspired Eric was the first in a long line of “traditional” double-ender designs that William Atkin and his son spent much time refining. Check out the Atkin’s website .
    Billy Atkin was originally commissioned by Bill Nutting (editor of Motorboat mag.) and Arthur Hildebrand (author of Blue Water) in the 1920’s to design a 32′ version of the Archer Redinskoite. At the time, what they considered would be the ideal cruising boat.

    *John Leather-Colin Archer and his seaworthy Double-enders; Ferenc Mate-Best Boats to Build or Buy; Roger Taylor-More Good Boats.

    PS: My W32 is the driest 32′ boat I’ve ever sailed, probably because of the high freeboard and bulwarks.

    [Thanks David, I’ve updated the article to be more specific on the origins. I had previously lumped Aitkens into the general category of “Colin Archer double-enders” so did not mention him – Will]

  13. Norm Rhines says:

    Looks like a pretty good summery with a couple of points.

    1.) The wet snail (name) I believe was also reinforced by owners who pack around a very large garden of slime and growth on their boat bottoms. This is most important to the westsail 32 as she has a great deal of wetted surface which = more drag/foot of length when fouled, and will limit the boat to around 100 miles/day or less i.e. giving up 30 to 70 miles/day in extra drag.
    2.) down wind sailing proves to have much less water running back along the cabin trunk to the cockpit, = as dry as most boats. This could explain why so many W32’s have sailed around the world (there owners are just trying to stay dry and comfortable) wink wink.
    3.) In My opinion the W32 is not the boat to beat with, She will do it, and get you there, but it is like cutting a steak with a butter knife. (not much fun when it is tuff). She is a much better boat for running with the trades and ticking off the miles day after day.
    4.) Most owners have come to find out that with enough sail 300 sq ft + forward on the jib, even light winds < 5 kts, can give you reasonable performance moving at 50 to 75% wind speed.
    5.) you may want to also note that westsail was selling some of the W32's at a loss during 1975 as boats were sold Via fixed contracts months before they were built, and in the 70's the cost of resin was shooting the moon, that is why most current boat companies have material adjustments charges built in to pre-order contracts.

    Lastly:
    There is a Yahoo group for the westsail. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/westsail/
    With pictures of several boats there.

    Keep up the dream, It is cheaper than it has ever been.

  14. Norm Rhines says:

    Looks like a pretty good summery with a couple of points.

    1.) The wet snail (name) I believe was also reinforced by owners who pack around a very large garden of slime and growth on their boat bottoms. This is most important to the westsail 32 as she has a great deal of wetted surface which = more drag/foot of length when fouled, and will limit the boat to around 100 miles/day or less i.e. giving up 30 to 70 miles/day in extra drag.
    2.) down wind sailing proves to have much less water running back along the cabin trunk to the cockpit, = as dry as most boats. This could explain why so many W32’s have sailed around the world (there owners are just trying to stay dry and comfortable) wink wink.
    3.) In My opinion the W32 is not the boat to beat with, She will do it, and get you there, but it is like cutting a steak with a butter knife. (not much fun when it is tuff). She is a much better boat for running with the trades and ticking off the miles day after day.
    4.) Most owners have come to find out that with enough sail 300 sq ft + forward on the jib, even light winds < 5 kts, can give you reasonable performance moving at 50 to 75% wind speed.
    5.) you may want to also note that westsail was selling some of the W32's at a loss during 1975 as boats were sold Via fixed contracts months before they were built, and in the 70's the cost of resin was shooting the moon, that is why most current boat companies have material adjustments charges built in to pre-order contracts.

    Lastly:
    There is a Yahoo group for the westsail. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/westsail/
    With pictures of several boats there.

    Keep up the dream, It is cheaper than it has ever been.

  15. Mike Dougan says:

    I read the article and felt it was fairly accurate.  

    The one comment you will likely hear from owners is that the Wetsnail nickname is hardly deserved.  Based on the waterline length, the max hull speed is about 7kts, and it isn’t hard to get the boat up to that speed, which means it is as fast as any monohull of comparable size.  It’s the acceleration that is slower, but that’s what happens with a full keel.  You can’t really expect to compare a boat with a fin keel and bulb to a full keel boat in acceleration or in turning speed.  The trade-off though, is that they are much more comfortable riding through heavy seas.

    The ‘wet’ part of the nickname comes from the fact that the cockpit seats are flush with the side decks, so, any water channeling down the side deck is likely to wet your bottom.  However, my boat’s original owner/kit builder, had the foresight to install cockpit seat-backs that also serve as a cockpit combing.  So, she stays pretty dry.  And, it takes quite a sea, or angle of heel to get any water at all over that bulwarks anyway!

    The advice I usually give potential buyers is that if your normal sailing experience is a day sail, short tacking around a small harbor, this probably isn’t the boat for you.  But, if you want a solid, comfortable boat that can take you around the world, there are hardly any better for the price.

  16. Mike Dougan says:

    I read the article and felt it was fairly accurate.  

    The one comment you will likely hear from owners is that the Wetsnail nickname is hardly deserved.  Based on the waterline length, the max hull speed is about 7kts, and it isn’t hard to get the boat up to that speed, which means it is as fast as any monohull of comparable size.  It’s the acceleration that is slower, but that’s what happens with a full keel.  You can’t really expect to compare a boat with a fin keel and bulb to a full keel boat in acceleration or in turning speed.  The trade-off though, is that they are much more comfortable riding through heavy seas.

    The ‘wet’ part of the nickname comes from the fact that the cockpit seats are flush with the side decks, so, any water channeling down the side deck is likely to wet your bottom.  However, my boat’s original owner/kit builder, had the foresight to install cockpit seat-backs that also serve as a cockpit combing.  So, she stays pretty dry.  And, it takes quite a sea, or angle of heel to get any water at all over that bulwarks anyway!

    The advice I usually give potential buyers is that if your normal sailing experience is a day sail, short tacking around a small harbor, this probably isn’t the boat for you.  But, if you want a solid, comfortable boat that can take you around the world, there are hardly any better for the price.

  17. Bud Taplin says:

    I am surprised that you did not include my website in the references. I was the first General Manager at Westsail, was with them for 2+ years, then started my own custom boatbuilding company, Worldcruiser Yacht Company. I built a number of custom Westsail’s in my yard. My business since about 1988 is to supply replacement parts, advice, and information to all of the Westsail owners. I maintain a mailing list of about 1000 of the 1100 Westsail boats that were built.

    Most of the information in your article is correct, however I would strongly take objection to your comments about the W32 being wet and slow. Not so as proven by many owners that have tricked their boats out, and raced them in long distance races. Many first or high finishes on corrected time in the Pacific Cup, Newport to Bermuda, Marion to Bermuda, and New Orleans to Cancun.

    Also the ballast was always at least 7,000 lbs. Combinations of 7000 lbs. of lead, or 2000 lbs. of lead and 5000 lbs of steel punchings, saturated with polyester resin, and bonded over.

    [Thanks Bud, I’ve added the link and updated the article – Will]

  18. Bud Taplin says:

    I am surprised that you did not include my website in the references. I was the first General Manager at Westsail, was with them for 2+ years, then started my own custom boatbuilding company, Worldcruiser Yacht Company. I built a number of custom Westsail’s in my yard. My business since about 1988 is to supply replacement parts, advice, and information to all of the Westsail owners. I maintain a mailing list of about 1000 of the 1100 Westsail boats that were built.

    Most of the information in your article is correct, however I would strongly take objection to your comments about the W32 being wet and slow. Not so as proven by many owners that have tricked their boats out, and raced them in long distance races. Many first or high finishes on corrected time in the Pacific Cup, Newport to Bermuda, Marion to Bermuda, and New Orleans to Cancun.

    Also the ballast was always at least 7,000 lbs. Combinations of 7000 lbs. of lead, or 2000 lbs. of lead and 5000 lbs of steel punchings, saturated with polyester resin, and bonded over.

    [Thanks Bud, I’ve added the link and updated the article – Will]

  19. Lee Perry says:

    Nice to see you have added the Westsail 32 to the site. I have owned mine for 17 years and will send some pictures if you tell me how.

  20. Lee Perry says:

    Nice to see you have added the Westsail 32 to the site. I have owned mine for 17 years and will send some pictures if you tell me how.

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